My latest original post for HuffPost Healthy Living. ~~~ Expanding the Empathy Enigma To feel seen, known and loved. What we all want and need in this life, and what we all probably hope to provide to those we care about. How do we truly see, know and love someone when their experiences are so …

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After the hateful firestorm from my HuffPost Parents piece on Tuesday, my courage and fire were shining bright. So I wrote a follow up piece. HuffPost ran it just a few hours ago. I sincerely hope I did us justice. ~~~ Has the Internet Killed Compassion? I have been writing about my journey of recovery …

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Part One here. Part Two here. What do we need instead? Question Three of the Fertility Compassion Survey: What could have been a better way for the question to be asked? I had two strong responses to this question: mind your own business and love. Don’t ask Over a third of my responses came from …

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Part One here. Our response to sympathy versus empathy When we practice empathy we connect. When we receive empathy we feel seen, known and loved. In other words, we all feel not so alone in this huge, hard world. Sympathy on the other hand is a sure fire way for us to all feel disconnected. When I …

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Because you can’t, sometimes things just can’t be fixed I’m sad. Just cheer up, it will be okay! I’m anxious. Just take a deep breath and calm down. I’m angry. Just count to 10 or walk away. We’re having trouble getting pregnant. Just adopt! Just relax! Just stopping trying! We think these above statements are empathy. …

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My definition of fertility is one’s ability to make a family. And, when I write make I don’t mean produce. My definition of compassion is the ability to find and practice empathy for others. And, when I write empathy I definitely do not mean sympathy (remember sympathy is I feel for you and empathy is I …

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August 25th, 1994 I had my first of two back surgeries, both of which left me in a body cast for 6 months following each surgery. Twenty years later these are the words I need to say to that part of who I am still to this today. The words to that scared 14 year …

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